Horizontal inverted V antenna

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wb3cez
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Mar 21, 2004 11:11 am

Horizontal inverted V antenna

Post by wb3cez » Wed May 25, 2011 6:16 pm

I have been wanting to put up an antenna for 160 meters, but have space restrictions. The property is plenty long enough but my shack is located at one end of it. Running an inverted V or center fed dipole will place the feed point too far from the house and will present other problems with where the coax would come down. Is it possable to place an inverted V antenna in a horizontal configuration with the center feedpoint closest to the house? I have searched the net but could find no references to this. [/b]

k4kk
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Location: The great state of Tennessee

Re: Horizontal inverted V antenna

Post by k4kk » Thu May 26, 2011 3:04 pm

wb3cez wrote:I have been wanting to put up an antenna for 160 meters, but have space restrictions. The property is plenty long enough but my shack is located at one end of it. Running an inverted V or center fed dipole will place the feed point too far from the house and will present other problems with where the coax would come down. Is it possable to place an inverted V antenna in a horizontal configuration with the center feedpoint closest to the house? I have searched the net but could find no references to this. [/b]
It is entirely possible. There are a couple of things to consider:
1. A horizontal "V" is quite directional with the large lobe from the apex through the 2 legs (exactly opposite the way the V points). There will be other lobes but they will not be as strong. It isn't "omin-directional" but is multi-directional with one main lobe. A good way to envision is it is to consider an omni-directional circle and move the center to a point that is not in the center.
2. The angle of radiation is going to depend on the feedpoint height and may be rather high which will limit the DX capability somewhat (it won't eliminate it).

wb3cez
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Mar 21, 2004 11:11 am

Horizonal inverted V antenna

Post by wb3cez » Thu May 26, 2011 8:29 pm

Thanks very much for your reply regarding the horizontal V antenna. I think my main concern was would the antenna in that configuration be able to maintain a 50 to 75 ohm impedence at the feedpoint. Apparently it would, although as you say, it change the pattern considerably. This probably would not be a problem in that the antenna would radiate towards the north which is what i desire. Thanks again De wb3cez[/b]

KA9FOX
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Post by KA9FOX » Fri May 27, 2011 1:24 pm

You probably are aware of this, but the feedline loss at 160m is going to be negligible. I have my Inverted vee up 90 feet, with 400+ feed of feedline, and works very well, both domestically and DX. I am in a quiet location, which helps on receive... and I use my 80 meter dipole primarily as the rx antenna.

73 - Scott KA9FOX

w5ghu
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WB3CEZ horizontal inverted vee antenna

Post by w5ghu » Wed Nov 02, 2011 8:48 pm

Paul- you received some good comments. I will pass along my experience with a low horizontal vee dipole on 160 meters. My property is limited to 120 feet east and west. My dipole has feed point at 22 feet, then the two elements travel east and west, each one 60 feet in the air. At that point, each element drops down to the wood perimeter fence, and travels about 60 feet on top of the 6 foot perimeter wood fence. I roll each end shorter and longer, while watching the SWR and adjusting for the lowest SWR for the part of the band I am interested in , I usually only change it every two years or so. The part of the dipole closest to the feed point provides most of the radiation, the ends are for impedance adjustment, in my language. The proof that it works, is my contact with US Virgin Islands from my location in SE Arizona, about 2,000 miles, (500 watts SSB). North, I have worked Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, around 1400 miles. ( 400 watts cw). Feed line coax is 100 feet long. That is the story. Bill W5GHU

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