Proofread your ad before posting.

This is the place to discuss the QTH.com Classifieds (http://swap.qth.com). Please be constructive.
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N8QBY
Posts: 105
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 10:11 pm
Location: Michigan

Proofread your ad before posting.

Post by N8QBY » Sun Jan 02, 2011 1:48 pm

This has been mentioned many times before, but here we go again. Please proofread your ad before posting. I find it hard to take an ad seriously if the poster won't take the time to proofread their ad, and to correct spelling mistakes. There are many online dictionaries available. Some browsers have a built-in spell-check feature. This example was posted recently. Speaks for itself.
"FOR SALE MY YEASUE 2800M
I bought this new still have the original box and paper work.and everthing that came with it new . never been mobile power chord has not been cut. gauranteed not be doa. a good starter radio.has been kept in great conditio. reason for selling i have aquaried a ssb 2 meter rig its just taking up space in my shack.... asking 110.00 plush shiping.. also puts out 65 watts on high power."

k4kk
Posts: 207
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2003 12:20 am
Location: The great state of Tennessee

Post by k4kk » Sun Jan 02, 2011 8:52 pm

i dont unnerstan wat yuor problim is

W4AIN
Posts: 113
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 11:38 pm
Location: Louisville, KY

I agree...sorta

Post by W4AIN » Wed Feb 16, 2011 6:03 pm

Although I do agree that many, if not most, ads have misspelled words, I find it much easier to decipher the ads than speaking to many individuals about their ads. I have a hard time trying to decipher all of the different dialects and pronunciations used in different parts of our country. Case in point, the word water is pronounced as watah, auter, woter, and many variations of these depending on whom you are talking to.
So, when I see the word Yeasue I am intelligent enough to know that the writer is referring to a Yaesu. However, when I am speaking to someone and they say something like "Yazoo", "Tain-Tach", "Kain-wood", "aimp" or "raddeo" it takes me aback momentarily and I can lose track of what is being said.
Phil - W4AIN
On The Air Communications
www.w4ain.com

n9vao
Posts: 85
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Wisconsin

Post by n9vao » Thu Mar 24, 2011 1:32 am

I agree very much that people need to proof read their ad before posting. I have seen over the years a lot of mistakes in spelling and proper use of words in a sentence. I get a kick out of someone saying that they have the "mike" for the radio. I would rather have the mic that came with it.
Another problem I see a lot of are the pictures posted with the ad. Many are so dark you can hardly tell what it is. To me the purpose of a photo with the ad is to show its condition.

kg8lb
Posts: 266
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2009 11:37 pm

Post by kg8lb » Fri Mar 25, 2011 4:11 pm

n9vao wrote:. I have seen over the years a lot of mistakes in spelling and proper use of words in a sentence. I get a kick out of someone saying that they have the "mike" for the radio. I would rather have the mic that came with it.
.
Probably a moot point since both "mike" and "mic" are acceptable slang terms meaning "microphone. Of course the m would be an upper case "M" for the name "Mike".

MicrophoneFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A Neumann U87 condenser microphone with shock mountA microphone (colloquially called a mic or mike; both pronounced /ˈmaɪk/[1]) is an acoustic-to-electric transducer or sensor that converts sound into an electrical signal. In 1876, Emile Berliner invented the first microphone used as a telephone voice transmitter. Microphones are used in many applications such as telephones, tape recorders, karaoke systems, hearing aids, motion picture production, live and recorded audio engineering, FRS radios, megaphones, in radio and television broadcasting and in computers for recording voice, speech recognition, VoIP, and for non-acoustic purposes such as ultrasonic checking or knock sensors.

Image


My real favorites are "needs restored" "needs overspray" . Do they mean "Needs to be restored." ? Then again why would anyone really want "overspray" on their gear ?
OK, So where are the filters now ?

n9vao
Posts: 85
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Wisconsin

Post by n9vao » Fri Mar 25, 2011 4:22 pm

Mic is an abbreviation of the word microphone and Mike is short for Michael. Neither is a slang for amateur radio. When you are talking about the item you talk into for your voice to go into a radio for broadcast over the air you are talking about a mic or microphone, not a Mike.

kg8lb
Posts: 266
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2009 11:37 pm

Post by kg8lb » Sat Mar 26, 2011 10:48 am

n9vao wrote:Mic is an abbreviation of the word microphone and Mike is short for Michael. Neither is a slang for amateur radio. When you are talking about the item you talk into for your voice to go into a radio for broadcast over the air you are talking about a mic or microphone, not a Mike.
Have to disagree but both terms are acceptable colloquialisms for "microphone" Although in more recent times "mic" is used far more frequently, "mike" (lower case m) remains an acceptable term . You may happen to prefer "mic" but "mike" has also been in very regular use , probably before either of us were born. I have offered up but one reference and a photo supporting my stance. There are of course many others.
I personally use "mic" but also recognize "mike" without need to question.

RE:


What is the proper abbreviation for microphone mic or mike?
In: Acronyms and Abbreviations, Audio Editing and Recording
Both are common usage. In the last decade, "mic" has been rising in popularity.


"Mike" was first reported used in 1927. The first usage of "mic" is thought to be 1961.It's believed "mic" has gained popularity because it is the common abbreviation on sound boards.

Common complaints against mic are that it reads like "Mick", and it breaks normal grammar usage (a long "i" with a hard "c" sound sould be spelled: "ike") . Other abbreviations (coke, nuke, bike) virtually always are spelled to reflect the intended pronunciation. Also, conjugations of "mic" are awkward. (although the proper conjugations are miked and miking).


Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_p ... z1HhY5DlXN
OK, So where are the filters now ?

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